Program

Day 1:  September 4th, 2024
Venue: Jackson Center - 6001 Moquin Dr NW, Huntsville, AL 

Welcome

8:45-8:50 CDT 


Introductory Remarks

8:50-9:00 TBD

Session 1
09:00 - 10:30 Progammatic Needs

Moderators - Tsengdar Lee (NASA), David Page (ORNL)

TBD

Key Questions

TBD

Panelists

  • Todd Johanessen, NGA 
  • May Yuan, NSF
  • Mike Tischler, USGS
  • Dr. Sid Ahmed Boukabara, NASA/ESD
  • Dr. Kunhikrishnan (Kunhi) Thengumthara, OSTP/ICAMS

    10:30–11:00 Networking Break

    Session 2
    11:00 - 12:30 Data and Infrastructure

    Moderators - Katie Baynes, NASA and Forrest Hoffman, ORNL

    TBD

    Key Questions

    TBD

    Panelists

    TBC

    12:30-14:00 Lunch

    Session 3

    14:00–15:30 Artificial Intelligence

    Moderators - Wenwen Li, ASU, Lexie Yang, ORNL, Sujit Roy, UAH

    TBD

    Key Questions

    TBD

    Panelists

    TBC

    15:30–16:00 Networking Break

    Session 4

    16:00–17:00 Hardware and Software Architectures

    Moderators - Shubha Ranjan, NASA and Valentine Anantharaj, ORNL

    TBD

    Key Questions

    TBD

    Panelists

    • Chris Zimmer, ORNL
    • Neena Imam, SMU

    17:30 Dinner: TBC

    Keynote:  TBC

    Day 2 : September 5th, 2024
    Venue: Jackson Center - 6001 Moquin Dr NW, Huntsville, AL 

    Session 5

    09:00–10:30 Climate and Water Security

    Moderators - Carter Christopher and Assaf Anyamba, ORNL

    The concept of a digital twin for water is getting increasing visibility among the Earth science and engineering communities, yet these communities define and model water systems uniquely. Additionally, the data used within these communities are themselves not well integrated, and across these communities even less so. With climate change expected to impact water security across the globe, an integrated view is essential to situational awareness and risk and resilience assessments. Harmonizing these datasets and modeling frameworks also can enable the development of a digital twin of water. If we define a digital twin as a temporally accurate and specific representation of Earth’s water state, availability, and quality, there are significant challenges that emerge to this harmonization. This session will explore the need, opportunity, and challenges with creating a digital twin of water, including the data disparities and gaps, and the role of GeoAI foundation models as an integrating framework.

    Key Questions

    1. What are the key datasets characterizing Earth’s water system that need integration, and what are the impediments to harmonization that this community can address?
    2. What are the data gaps, sensing gaps, and model gaps that must be addressed to enable a digital twin for water?
    3. What is the role of GeoAI relative to traditional remote sensing techniques for harmonizing dataset spatial resolution, filling data gaps, and improving temporal cadence and consistency?

    Panelists

    • Rebecca Peters (DoS)

    10:30-11:00 Networking Break

    Session 6

    11:00–12:00 People and Partnerships

    Moderators - Beth Plale , IU and Samantha Arundel, USGS

    TBD

    Key Questions

    People:  How much trust can be placed in AI-augmented tools and results of AI-augmented tools? How will people interact with these systems? How much autonomy should an AI enabled Digital Twin have?
    Partnerships:  Are there community consortiums/venues for continued (or related) conversations?  What are the vehicles for stakeholder involvement?   Who are the emerging partners from commercial companies?

    Panelists

    TBC

    12:00 Closing Remarks.